Essay

Lisa Bennett reviews The Bee and the Orange Tree for ABR

Thank you to Australian Book Review and Lisa Bennett for reviewing The Bee and the Orange Tree. In their earliest incarnations, fairy tales are gruesome stories riddled with murder, cannibalism, and mutilation. Written in early seventeenth-century Italy, Giambattista Basile’s Cinderella snaps her stepmother’s neck with the lid of a trunk. This motif reappears in the… Continue reading Lisa Bennett reviews The Bee and the Orange Tree for ABR

Interview

The woman behind the first fairy tale: Phillip Adams interviews Melissa Ashley for Late Night Live

On Monday, 4th November, I had the extraordinary honour of being interviewed by Phillip Adams for Late Night Live, to discuss the heroine of my new novel, The Bee and the Orange Tree, Marie Catherine d’Aulnoy. You can listen to the podcast here Marie Catherine D’Aulnoy was the first author to use the term ‘Fairy… Continue reading The woman behind the first fairy tale: Phillip Adams interviews Melissa Ashley for Late Night Live

Interview · Presentation

Booktopia Books Podcast Chats to Melissa Ashley

In late October I had the pleasure of dropping in to Booktopia’s Sydney offices to sign copies of The Bee and the Orange Tree and to record a podcast with Ben Hunter and Olivia Fricot on delving into the life of 17th century French writer Marie Catherine d’Aulnoy. Melissa Ashley is a writer, poet, birder… Continue reading Booktopia Books Podcast Chats to Melissa Ashley

Review

Samantha Brennan reviews The Bee and the Orange Tree

Why I had to pick it up That blurb! Okay, let me go back a little… Right now, I’m wrists-deep in metaphorical ink, writing and plotting my middle-grade fantasy series Stella Duke and the Sandgirl’s Curse. The history and politics of the magical world I’m painstakingly building have their beginnings in French author Charles Perrault’s 1697… Continue reading Samantha Brennan reviews The Bee and the Orange Tree

Articles

The woman who coined the term ‘fairy tale’ risked prison to write coded messages of rebellion

RN By Anna Kelsey-Sugg for Late Night Live Updated 7 Nov 2019, 11:55am In 1600s Paris, one woman undertook an act of rebellion. Her weapon was fairy tales Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy — who’d been married off at 15 to an abusive man three decades her elder — slipped messages of resistance into her popular stories, risking jail in the process. D’Aulnoy… Continue reading The woman who coined the term ‘fairy tale’ risked prison to write coded messages of rebellion

Articles

The first fairytales were feminist critiques of patriarchy. We need to revive their legacy

The women who created the first fairytales were far more radical than the Brothers Grimm have led us to believe Most revolutions begin quietly, in narrative. Take, for instance, fairytales. The popular understanding is that fairytales evolved exclusively from oral folktellers – from the uneducated “Mother Goose” nurse, passing into the imaginations of children by… Continue reading The first fairytales were feminist critiques of patriarchy. We need to revive their legacy

Interview

Q&A with Melissa Ashley on her novel ‘The Bee and the Orange Tree’

https://writersvictoria.org.au/writing-life/featured-writers/qa-melissa-ashley-on-her-novel-the-bee-and-the-orange-tree By: Melissa Ashley interviewed by Tara Mitchell TM: Your second novel, ‘The Bee and the Orange Tree’, tells the tale of Marie Catherine and her battle for French women’s’ equality in 1699. How did you come across Marie Catherine and what inspired you to tell her story? MA: I discovered Marie Catherine while researching another project,… Continue reading Q&A with Melissa Ashley on her novel ‘The Bee and the Orange Tree’